Unilever stock

Unilever was one of the first stocks I bought in late May. At the moment it’s one of my largest positions. The stock has been in decline for months now. :worried: Anyone else in this stock?

I bought for the long term so I’m not really worried yet, just a bit annoyed to see it down so much. And mostly wondering when a turnaround will finally come. Maybe in a more bearish market people will return to this defensive consumer staples stock… What do you guys think?

And how much of an impact does Unilever daughter company Ben & Jerry’s decision to stop selling in the Palestinian occupied territories play? From what I see, Unilever is getting a lot of backlash for it in the US, with people boycotting Unilever brands and some states sueing them over the move of B&J, which they say is illegal/anti-Semitic/… . Complete overreaction in my opinion, but they’re a huge market with s big impact, of course. Then again, I did read Ben & Jerry’s sales are up like 20% since their decision. :icecream::peace_symbol::v:t2:

Thoughts?

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Sit still and relax! Nothing to worry about. :+1:

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Indeed what @Cornel said, enjoy the stock maybe raise your position due to a better price. And enjoy the quarterly dividend! I had aswell. If you don’t feel comfortable with it. You should take a look at Danone, nestle, PepsiCo, P&G or Kraft Heinz

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@DaveyV19 cheers for the tips! Pepsi I own already. I actually own a lot of these defensive consumer staple stocks. Others I own are Coca Cola, Mondelez and Colgate-Palmolive. Sometimes I wonder if there is such a thing as being too defensive on your positions :joy:

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There isn’t hahah! Because I own them too! PepsiCo, coca cola, Walmart, Abbvie, altria, HAHA!

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A company should not take sides in politics, that is just bad business. They should be punished for it and they where, as investment firms and banks sold there stock.
Beside that it also lowered dividend that doesn’t help.
Beside that prices of raw materials and shipping is also up. Having less profit margin on goods. Unless they hyperinflate there consumer prices.
B&J selling more is just temporary as the feel good rich people wanna show off and the young people wanna fight the opression that isn’t really there, they actually lost a big part of there primary shoppers, the families with kids and the people over 35+ so in a few months from now this brand wil sell less.
They should dump ben&jerry

@yohhst i don’t think there is such thing as too defensive, I think investing is something personal and if you feel save by these companies what I can imagine very well! You should do that! I always think high risk high reward low risk still high reward. I am not sure but i read an article dividend kings(defensives) vs s&p 500…. In the last 25 years the s&p won 19 times. But in the other 6 years the s&p dropped so much compared to the kings that in 25 years the kings where a better investment… just relaxed and make your judgement

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@Betguardian

One of the main reasons why the anti-apartheid movement succeeded in isolating South Africa in the 1980s is that it convinced major companies, such as Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Co, Reebok and Ford, to stop doing business with the country.

I don’t think it really hurt Coca Cola, Pepsi or Ford in the long run when they boycotted South Africa and helped end apartheid there. Should business really have no conscience, according to you? Especially brands that have a whole philosophy that’s intertwined with the brand image surely make decisions like this all the time. Choosing the environmentally friendly road as many companies are trying, is considered by some to be political too. And bad business, as the transition can eat away at profit margins. But I don’t see it like that at all. This Unilever situation isn’t any different. But that’s just my opinion.

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If you are confident in the stock you bought, after your own analysis, and you deemed it worthy to buy you should be delighted that it is dropping in price.
This means you can buy more of it at a cheaper price.

I’m keeping an eye on Unilever myself but at the moment I am purchasing stocks in a different sector.

Defensive stocks like Unilever are never really a bad choice unless they are hugely overvalued, just wait it out. You should not buy stocks like this for the capital gains but rather for the consistent dividend.

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@JPeters saying some important stuff here! If you are confident in the stock you bought, after your own analysis, and you deemed it worthy to buy you should be delighted that it is dropping in price.

Say you like that one pair of jeans a lot. It costs €100,- a pair tho and you think it’s too expensive. One week later it is for sale and you purchase for €50,-. It’s nice right? Same goes for stocks (or other assets). If I find the stock interesting at €50,- than I’ll probably be even more interested at €40,-. If nothing has changed fundamentally so your analysis still stands, it’s a nice chance to lower your average purchase price.

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interesting article to add to this.

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